I to We Leadership Weekend Agenda


Friday, November 11, 2016

10:00 a.m. 
Welcome

Late-Breaking News through an Old, Steady Lens
Presenter: Mark Bauer, MD
Join Dr. Bauer as he re-examines assessment and care for individuals with mood disorders using “ancient” concepts (i.e., from the 1970s) that are as relevant today as when they were first introduced.  He will review selected recent developments in care for depression and bipolar disorder from the biological, psychological, and social realms and will propose an integrated approach to understanding and caring for mental health conditions.

11:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Lunch (included)

1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Becoming Well
Presenter: Tim Bono, PhD
Positive psychology expert, Dr. Bono, will cover topics such as:

  • Psychological Wellness: how happiness is not just the opposite of unhappiness
  • Wellness through resilience: learning and growing from previous mistakes; giving ourselves permission to be human
  • Wellness through Gratitude: focusing on the good in our lives 
  • Prosocial Wellness: the importance of spending time with others and maintaining engagement in our communities
  • Physical Wellness: the importance of sleep and exercise to ensure both a healthy body and a healthy mind

2:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Break

2:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Keynote by Melody Moezzi 

3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Closing 


Saturday, November 12, 2016

9:00 a.m. –10:00 a.m.
Opening Session: The Power of Sharing Your Story
Presenter: Gayathri Ramprasad
No matter your role - telling your story is a powerful way to not only make sense of your own experiences and see how far you’ve come, but also to provide support to others. A core component of peer support is sharing from your experiences in an effort to help a person see that they are not alone and that there are things they can do to improve their life. Sharing what has worked well for you on your journey introduces individuals to new wellness techniques and tips that they may not find elsewhere. This session will explore more about the importance of your story and offer some tips for crafting your own story.

10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.
Breakout sessions (Chose from the following tracks: Parents, Young Adults, Advocates, Chapters, and Peer Specialists) 

Chapter Leaders and Support Group Participants: Protective factors to help prevent suicide: the role of peer support
Presenters: Lisa Goodale and Jean
Dukarski
(Joint session with Peer Specialist track) Experiencing suicidal feelings and desires is common for many peers, and peer supporters can feel powerless to help others head off these feelings or deal with them productively. Participate in this session to learn about four common protective factors that can help lessen the desire to end one’s life, and learn how you can help your peers strengthen those protective factors in their lives. 

Peer Specialists: Protective factors to help prevent suicide: the role of peer support
Presenters: Lisa Goodale and Jean
Dukarski
(Joint session with Chapter track) Experiencing suicidal feelings and desires is common for many peers, and peer supporters can feel powerless to help others head off these feelings or deal with them productively. Participate in this session to learn about four common protective factors that can help lessen the desire to end one’s life, and learn how you can help your peers strengthen those protective factors in their lives. 

Grassroots Advocates: Mental Health Parity—Know Your Rights
Presenter: Phyllis Foxworth

Health care reform has increased access to mental health services for millions of Americans. But far too many people are not aware of their new rights. This workshop will review reforms in both private/commercial insurance plans and government health care programs and provide you with information on how to determine if your rights to care have been denied, as well as how to fight a benefit denial.

Parents: Making Mistakes and Moving Forward
Presenter: Christine Walker
Parenting is an incredibly rewarding and difficult task. For parents of children living with a mood disorder, parenting can be even more demanding. When making decisions in a high stress situation, parents may feel as if they made mistakes or regret their decisions. It can be hard to move forward. This session will talk about embracing that you are doing your very best and how to recognize/manage mistakes and still continue to move forward.

Young Adult Leaders: Coping with Feelings of Failed Expectations
Presenters: Tim Bono, PhD and Geralyn Dexter

Whether we put them on ourselves or feel pressure from the outside, we all have expectations of where we feel we should be in life. When we believe that we are not able to meet those expectations, we may begin to feel like we are failing ourselves. When you add in the constant barrage of happy people doing amazing things that the social media world presents, we may also feel that we’re falling behind our peers and moving even further away from the life we hoped to have. This session will bring together personal stories and strategies to help you reframe these experiences.

11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
Lunch (included)

12:45 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Breakouts by audience (Chose from the following tracks: Parents, Young Adults, Advocates, Chapters, and Peer Specialists)

Chapter Leaders and Support Group Participants: Discussion Roundtables
This session will offer facilitated roundtable discussions on various topics related to chapter management such as volunteer engagement, building a wellness-focused environment, and making connections in the community. Roundtables are designed to allow for candid conversation between chapter leaders about their experiences and ideas they may have. We encourage you to select topics that hold a particular interest for your community's chapter. You may switch groups at any time.

Peer Specialists: I can’t/I won’t/I’ll never: Tools to overcome negative self-talk
Presenters: Lisa Goodale and Jean
Dukarski
Face it: all of us are self-critical at times. But when a person’s negative self-view spirals into a never-ending cycle of pessimism that leads nowhere, recovery is undermined, and others trying to help can become frustrated. Improve your ability to help your peers understand the impact of negative thought patterns on their daily lives, recognize when negativity is setting in, and create a more productive and positive mindset that promotes a healthy lifestyle.

Grassroots Advocates: Grassroots Organizing—The Foundation for Raising our Collective Voice
Presenter: Phyllis Foxworth
When mobilized, DBSA participants can be a powerful voice in affecting positive change. Whether it’s eliminating discrimination, having a voice in the development of the next generation of medications, or educating elected officials on public health policies, your voice matters. Learn how DBSA Grassroots Organizations have formed in several states, and what projects they are working on. In addition, you’ll get the opportunity to participate in a community awareness project and learn through role playing that meeting with your state representative or senator can be a fun and rewarding experience with a little planning and some helpful tools from DBSA.

Parents: Lifestyle Management
Presenter: Geralyn Dexter and Jill Emmelhainz
Lifestyle management can often help with managing mood symptoms. This session will talk about ways that you can help minimize your child’s mood symptoms through sleep, exercise, keeping a routine, and self-care. We’ll also talk about ways to involve your child in the process, while making it fun too! 

Young Adult Leaders: Handling Life Transitions
Presenters: Tim Bono, PhD

Starting college, moving out on your own, first jobs, connecting with significant others, becoming a parent – people experience many changes between the ages of 18-29. For those living with a mood disorder, this time of life can be particularly difficult. This session will bring togetther personal stories and the tools others have learned to help them through these difficult transitions.

2:30 p.m. –3:30 p.m.
Closing Session: Combating Compassion Fatigue
Presenter: Beth Egge
Before we can talk about “Compassion Fatigue” we must first talk about compassion. Compassion is such a beautiful thing yet literally means “to suffer together.”  Those of us with lived experience of a mood disorder, as well as those who work with or care for someone with a mood disorder, have a different understanding of compassion.  To say, “compassion is tiring” is an understatement. Compassion Fatigue can effect so many areas of our lives, including our work, our relationships, even how we see ourselves. Learning about self-compassion is key to guarding against Compassion Fatigue and the stress inherent in having, working with or caring for someone who has a mood disorder.

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